Convergence Insufficiency in Children

Randomized Clinical Trial of Treatments for Symptomatic Convergence Insufficiency in Children – more proof that vision therapy works!
Convergence Insufficiency (CI)Treatment Trial Study Group*
Arch Ophthalmol. 2008;126 (10):1336-1349.

This article is a landmark study because it demonstrated to key features.  The first key fact is that vision therapy can help correct the convergence insufficiency syndrome, which is a major contributing factor  to reading difficulties in children.  The second is that office treatments are more effective than home exercises.

Convergence insufficiency (CI), is a common binocular vision disorder that is often associated with a variety of symptoms, including eyestrain, headaches, blurred vision, diplopia, sleepiness, difficulty concentrating, movement of print while reading, and loss of comprehension after short periods of reading or performing close activities.  There are no visible signs of this condition; it can only be detected and diagnosed during an eye examination.  There are simple measurements of the eyes ability to converge or turn inward during reading.  There needs to be a proper ratio of this convergence to the distance from the reading material in order for reading to be efficient.

Dr. Mitchell Scheiman, FCOVD, has completed the 12-week study, known as the Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial (CITT), found that approximately 75 percent of those who received in-office therapy by a trained therapist plus at-home treatment reported fewer and less severe symptoms related to reading and other near work.  He states that “Once diagnosed, CI can be successfully treated with office-based vision therapy by a trained therapist along with at-home reinforcement.”To review the complete article